Four Strategies for Developing Healthy Client Relationships - Meeting a Demand with a Counter Demand | Next Level Mastery
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Four Strategies for Developing Healthy Client Relationships – Meeting a Demand with a Counter Demand

Four Strategies for Developing Healthy Client Relationships – Meeting a Demand with a Counter Demand

Article by Rob Mosley of Next Level Mastery

Part 4 of 4:  Developing Healthy Client Relationships

In my three previous posts I have shared with you strategies for developing healthy client relationships.   In part 1 of 4 we reviewed sharing insight with clients focusing on “information beyond the obvious”.   In part 2 of 4 the emphasis was on securing relationships with in an organization at multiple levels.  And in part 3 of 4 we focused on recognizing your client’s tactics, understanding why they use them and diminishing their effects while maintaining a healthy relationship.

In part 4 of 4 in this series let’s discuss client demands and your counter demands. It is important to understand that easily won concessions on your part are rarely valued and almost always result in additional demands.

Key Strategy #4:  Meet a Client Demand or Request with Counter Demand or Request  

A relationship built on concessions will never be a true partnership. Clients may call on price, but they buy on value or perceived value. If all you do is give things away, what’s your value? Easily won concessions on your part are rarely valued and almost always result in additional demands. A client demand or request should always be balanced with an equal and appropriate counter demand or request.

Conceding at the wrong time in a relationship for the wrong reason can actually do more harm than good. If you fail to differentiate yourself in your process, you will end up having to differentiate in your price. The client must perceive value in your search process. Clients who perceive great value will be more willing to pay a great price for the service. Clients who perceive little value in you will leave you the victim of a tough negotiation.

If you finish a client conversation with all of the action items on your end, ask yourself why. Everything we do as recruiters should drive some type of investment or commitment from the client. If not, what is the relevancy of what we’re doing?

The article is derived in part from the thinking of Randall Murphy and the Acclivus Corporation and their curriculum entitled R3 Negotiations customized specifically for the search and staffing industry.  This program is offered in a partnership with Next Level Exchange.

Rob MosleyWritten by: Rob Mosley, Next Level Exchange, Managing Partner, Training and Development

For more information on R3 Negotiations, Executive Search Best Practices, Client Development, Leadership and Management Best Practices workshops Contact Rob Mosley’s Client Service Manager,  Ita Harris,   direct 214.556.8018

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